Lime plastering Wiltshire/ damp survey wiltshire

By: admin | Posted on: November 10, 2020

I was recently asked to carry out a damp investigation to a property where damp issues had persisted for many years. My client had received conflicting advice from a number of different damp and lime experts. Some of this advice was to remove any modern materials and replace with lime render and lime plaster. Remove modern paint, and repoint with lime pointing putty. Other advice was to use a modern guaranteed system and damp proof walls. Another free damp survey specified to increase the ventilation in the property by installing a positive input ventilation (piv).

In this instance this is where it can get very worrying, as potentially a serious amount of money is about to spent, and neither of this is actually going to fix the root cause. This is a common scenario when a homeowner is a layperson and has no knowledge of how a damp survey should be carried out. Lets face it most people that come around to a property have a service to offer, and im sure most people are just trying to earn a living without the intention of trying to rip anybody off.

This job could have gone horribly wrong if our client hadn’t been advised by a family friend just about before she was going to have the lime plastering and lime pointing carried out to her Wiltshire property. Her friend advised her to contact me as we’ve recently helped out another friend with a very similar conflicting rising damp issue.

The damp survey

The art of any damp investigation is all about elimination of the root cause before coming to a conclusion. The well documented BRE digest 245 methodology is what I would say an averagely competent damp surveyor should follow, and this should aid any survey findings.  The reason I say this is because this methodology is recommended guidance in every British Standard in regards to damp. In this instance at this property the mortar sampling was very wet at the base of the wall (20% capillary moisture), along with a very low hygroscopic value (1.1%), with no high levels of nitrates or chlorides. By following this methodolgy and removing the plaster samples for analysis, I was able to confirm something that none of the previous surveyors, contractors, lime specialists had even mentioned. 

All of this points to either a mains leaks, plumbing leak, or drainage leak. This high amount of capillary moisture, along with a very low amount of hygroscopic value, is indicative of rising damp caused by excess water from a defect. True genuine long term rising damp always has hygroscopic salts like chlorides, and / or nitrates present.

I used our signal generator Ridgid SR20 to actually locate and trace the mains water coming from the road and into the property. Because the property had been extended, the original main was hidden under new concrete solid floors to the side extension. Once this was located I was then able to use My Aquaphon acoustic leak detection equipment all the way along the pipe to listen for any possible mains water leaks.

The property had some older original drainage systems in place, and some fairly modern drainage. I used my Ridgid drain CCTV inspection camera to inspect all drains around the property.

What I found during the CCTV inspection was that the drains were in need of urgent repair, as these defects were directly related to the amount of moisture that was producing rising damp symptoms within the property. What was good, was that my client was there and could view the camera inspecting the drainage for all the issues that I noted.

I used a tracking dye and a bung to flood the drains to exaggerate the issue, to track the path of the water. What I also found was that this drainage issue also caused damp issues to the cavity construction part of the extension also, as I was able to see it within the cavity wall.

By using Complete Preservation for the initial survey, we were then trusted to specify the repairs to the building to resolve the rising damp issues. 

As always budgets can be limited so quotations are really based on what needs to be done ASAP, and at what cost.

I specified drain patching, which was needed in numerous locations, along with connecting an old soak away to mains drainage, as this wasn’t draining as desired. 

Ground levels were lowered as per our typical drawing.

Modern masonry paint is to be removed at low level  (150mm from the floor) to aid evaporation at the base of the wall. Lime putty repointing was also specified for low level  areas where pointing was needed. 

Please see the below video of a 1 minute demo of how to remove modern masonry paint, and how to lower the high ground levels.

Top tip

Before you spend money on any damp proofing works, or even lime plastering, lime rendering, lime pointing in regards to damp issues, it would be worth paying for professional guidance to eliminate damp root causes. It would be prudent to have a CCTV drain survey, leak detection, and also mortar/plaster sampling following the methodology in BRE DIGEST 245 where needed. The reason I say this is because I’ve seen numerous lime plastering jobs fail because none of the above has been carried out. Lime plastering is a fantastic product, but it isn’t going to perform as desired when there are defective drains, and the walls are very wet. When walls are very wet it is also a good idea to use some drying equipment to lower the moisture content of the wall. 

If you need further advice regarding damp issues and lime plastering costs please email enquiries@completepreservation.co.uk


Sympathetic rising damp solutions

By: admin | Posted on: October 29, 2020

First of all lets just agree that rising damp occurs. It might get mis-diagnosed by damp surveyors, and it also might not get resolved first time.

It isn’t unusual for people to have spent a few thousand on surveys and damp repairs and still have damp issues. Elimination of all potential causes before coming to a conclusion is essential to ensure the correct diagnosis, and move forward with options of repairs.

High external ground levels are a common issue when it comes to rising damp. High ground levels contribute to the height of which rising damp can rise, as it will restrict evaporation at the base of the wall.

General external basic defects like guttering leaks, and drip detailing also need to be rectified. It is always advisable for you to monitor your building during heavy rain to see how your building is dealing with rainwater. It is easy to spot guttering defects, and possibly a blocked drain.

French drains, or French moats as many people call them actually cause more of an issue in regards to damp. This is because they never get maintained, they can’t get inspected unless a CCTV drain camera is used. If a drain blocks, and surcharges these often get filled with silt etc, and even tissues if connected to a foul drain.

The pictures below from a recent damp survey highlight the above issues with flooded French drains, silt build up, along with root infiltration.

Drains are perhaps one of the biggest contributors to rising damp issues. These rarely get inspected as generally most surveyors don’t own any drain surveying equipment.

The picture below shows a CCTV drain survey picked up the cause of this long term rising damp issue in Wiltshire. As you can see there is a damage to the drain pipe that is connected to the toilet. This cause of rising damp and a rotten suspended timber floor couldn’t of been found without a CCTV drain survey.

We understand how to find and diagnose all types of damp issues, and also have the experience, and know how on how to repair any defects.

If you need a damp survey to help locate potential causes to offer a long term solution, please give us a shout.


Drain Patching / lining

By: admin | Posted on: October 17, 2020

Complete Preservation carry out CCTV drain surveys, along with drain repairs using our unique drain lining / patching system with fast cure times. Our drain patching system is a no dig system, which means most repairs can be carried out below ground, without any disturbance to above ground areas. This can save time and money if drives, paths, and even home internal floor finishes can remain in situ. The below image demonstrates a damaged drain pipe on the left hand side, and a drain lining system that has been installed on the right hand side.

drain lining and drain patching wiltshire

Damaged drain symptoms

If you have rising damp issues on your external or internal walls, damp or flooding in your sub floor void that’s causing dry rot or wet rot, blocked drains, slow draining drains, walls that have cracking / subsidence, this is likely to be related to drain defects. These defects could be caused by root intrusion, and damaged/cracked drains, and need to be inspected and possibly be eliminated with a drain CCTV camera to prevent further issues.

We offer quantitative moisture analysis when it comes to rising damp, following the methodology in BRE Digest 245, along with all types of sympathetic damp repairs, dry rot and wet rot repair, to include drying of sub floor voids.

Contact us to discuss your issues, and we can offer you some professional guidance where needed.

enquiries@completepreservation.co.uk


What is BRE DIGEST 245

By: admin | Posted on: August 30, 2020

Also called BRE DG 245.

It is part of Building Research Establishment (BRE) digests on authoritative summaries of state of the art on specific topics in construction design and technology. They draw on BRE’s expertise in these areas and provide essential support for all involved in design, specification, construction and maintenance. This particular document can be purchased direct from BRE for just £15.00 here https://www.brebookshop.com/details.jsp?id=287528

This Digest considers the causes of dampness in walls and offers a positive method for diagnosis of rising damp. It suggests possible remedial measures that can be taken to avoid rising damp such as providing a complete moisture barrier by insertion of a physical damp-proof course or the non-traditional method of chemical injection. The repair of plaster damaged by damp is also discussed.

Mechanism of rising damp

For water to rise in a wall, a supply must be available at the base. If the ground surrounding the wall is saturated, this condition is achieved, but if the ground is not saturated the soil will exert a suction that will oppose
the upward capillary pull on the water in the wall. This suction is approximately equivalent to the negative pressure exerted by a column of water extending from the base of the wall to the water table. If the water table falls, the height of the moisture in the wall will drop to a new level provided there is sufficient time for equilibrium to become established. Each period of heavy rain on the ground at the base of the wall will produce a temporary condition of saturation and the water level in the wall will begin to rise again.

The level to which it rises depends on two factors: the amount of evaporation of water from a wet wall and on the resistance to the flow of moisture up the wall. If this resistance is high (as in a material with many fine pores), the effect of evaporation is most marked reducing the appearance of rising damp, but if the wall material has many coarse pores, the height of dampness will be only slightly affected by normal rates of evaporation.

Increasing the heat input to the structure will increase the rate of evaporation from the wall surfaces. The overall effect is to increase the rate of flow of water up the wall but because of the resistance to flow this is likely to be accompanied by a reduction in the height to which the moisture extends.

In addition, evaporation will occur from deep in the pores of the plaster so that the rising damp seems to disappear. In summer, hot weather will increase the evaporation rate and lower the water table so the effect of reducing the appearance of the rising damp can be even more striking.

Water drawn from the soil usually contains a low concentration of soluble salts and the rising water will also dissolve salts present in the bricks or the mortar. When evaporation occurs the salt solution becomes more concentrated at the surface and eventually the salts will crystallise out. This tends to block the pores, reducing evaporation and hence raises the level of dampness. These salts may also be hygroscopic and will absorb moisture from the air above some critical value of relative humidity so that the surface becomes wet during wet weather, although this dampness disappears when the air becomes drier again.

All this suggests that under real, dynamic conditions rising damp in a wall is often in a rather sensitive equilibrium which may be considerably disturbed by changes in the heating of the building and in the level of the water table. The presence of hygroscopic salts tends to obscure any drying associated with such changes by keeping the wall more moist than it would otherwise be. If such salts are removed from the surface by removing the old plaster, and the heating system is improved, it is likely that the apparent dramatic improvement in the appearance of the wall surface will give the impression that the rising damp has been cured when this is not actually the case. It is against this background that the correct diagnosis of rising damp becomes important.

BRE DIGEST 245 is the only way to offer quantitative moisture analysis to prove if a wall has rising damp. This is well documented in the British Standard, BS 6576, BS 5250. BRE digest 245 clearly shows multiple pictures of possible causes of rising damp where there is a physical damp proof course installed that has been bridged by one way or another.

The above image shows rising damp being caused by the damp proof course being bridged by the plaster

Obviously solid wall properties built before a physical damp proof courses were installed can still have similar causes like high ground levels, modern renders rendered to the floor etc, that can cause rising damp issues. Many older properties also had land drainage incorporated around the property which were installed if an area was deemed to be very wet, which is discussed BRE DIGEST 245. I’ve personally noted this on many of the older historic local buildings I have worked on in the area. This is an extract from my local Bye-laws of the in Warminster Local Board from 1858. Drainage of subsoil and prevention of damp. The house drainage shall be constructed, either with additional eathernware pipe drains or otherwise, as to drain the subsoil of the premises, whenever the dampness of the site appears to the Board to render this necessary; and all the rain-water shall be so drained or conveyed from the roofs of the buildings as to prevent its dripping on to the ground and causing dampness in the walls.

In addition, evaporation will occur from deep in the pores of the plaster so that the rising damp seems to disappear. In summer, hot weather will increase the evaporation rate and lower the water table so the effect of reducing the appearance of the rising damp can be even more striking.

Water drawn from the soil usually contains a low concentration of soluble salts and the rising water will also dissolve salts present in the bricks or the mortar. When evaporation occurs the salt solution becomes more concentrated at the surface and eventually the salts will crystallise out. This tends to block the pores, reducing evaporation and hence raises the level of dampness. These salts may also be hygroscopic and will absorb moisture from the air above some critical value of relative humidity so that the surface becomes wet during wet weather, although this dampness disappears when the air becomes drier again.

All this suggests that under real, dynamic conditions rising damp in a wall is often in a rather sensitive equilibrium which may be considerably disturbed by changes in the heating of the building and in the level of the water table. The presence of hygroscopic salts tends to obscure any drying associated with such changes by keeping the wall more moist than it would otherwise be. If such salts are removed from the surface by removing the old plaster, and the heating system is improved, it is likely that the apparent dramatic improvement in the appearance of the wall surface will give the impression that the rising damp has been cured when this is not actually the case. It is against this background that the correct diagnosis of rising damp becomes important

Experience has shown that it is much more difficult to diagnose the source of dampness in a wall than is generally supposed. It is particularly difficult where the presence of some soluble salts greatly complicates the situation, especially when just a damp meter is being used.

BRE DIGEST 245 is guidance on the diagnosis of rising damp on a rational basis. The basis of the method proposed is to to drill samples, from the wall and measure the free water value and hygroscopic value of the said samples. The aim is to establish whether any dampness damage is caused by rising damp as opposed to other processes, then a location away from other sources like drains, gutter leaks etc. If visible damp or high damp meter readings are located on external and internal walls, ideally many samples should be taken as multiple causes could be causing the symptoms.

Once all of the laboratory analysis is finalised, then we can produce a graph detailing the moisture, and this will help determine the damp issue.

Whilst gravimetric sampling is far superior than using a carbide meter/speedy meter, it is imperative that the guidance in BS: 6576 is used to eliminate other potential causes. An example being that perhaps gravimetrics have proved that rising damp is a cause of the decorative internal spoiling, which is the actual sympton of rising damp. The actual cause of the rising damp could still be something like damaged below ground drainage that would need to subjected to a CCTV drain survey. Gravimetrics and hygroscopic salt analysis sometimes points to there being no nitrates or chlorides present, which then points to drain issues or leaks within the property. This means that finding the root cause, and drying of the building is all that is needed, rather than removing all of the plaster and getting it replaced.

Whilst it sometimes might sound like a slow process and unduly complicated, but no simpler procedure has proved to be reliable.

Some damp issues can cost a small fortune to fix, and so can the amount of errors in damp diagnosis by damp experts. This is why it is imperative that the diagnosis is correct first time.

If you need advice regarding damp issues, give us a shout.

Please don’t contact us for free damp surveys, as this isn’t something we offer. enquiries@completepreservation.co.uk


Leak detection to find the cause of damp

By: admin | Posted on: August 19, 2020

I was recently contacted by a landlord to dry down a property after a leak on a new build property. There have been 2 previous plumbers that had been instructed to find the leak and rectify it. I was of the understanding they had carried out what they had been paid to do. When I visited the property to install our Corroventa drying equipment, it was obvious to me there must still be a leak as I could see water droplets on the ceiling. The ceiling seemed in pretty good condition with the possibility of being saved. I wanted to do the least amount of damage possible to keep the cost of the repairs down. By using my Sewerin leak detection equipment I found the leak, as I could hear the dripping noise ever so slightly. This isn’t something you could hear without the acoustic listening equipment. And by using a Ridgid snake camera I could actually see the leak, and dripping of the water in the ceiling void.

The leak was on the cold feed to the sink on the push fit connection.

The leak was fixed and drying equipment installed. The Corroventa drying equipment is controlled by SuperVision, which also offers real time data logging. This equipment is worth it’s weight in gold during the hot weather as I could turn off the system if it became too hot in the property, or the tennant wanted it switched off at night. I also set high threshold alarms to alert me of high temperatures within the property.

If you have a leak or a damp issues give us a shout.


Rising damp, and drain survey Trowbridge

By: admin | Posted on: July 28, 2020

This is a property I have previously surveyed last year, where there were issues with penetrating damp. We found external issues with rainwater goods, peeling modern paint, rotten timber lintels etc. We removed the modern masonry paint using our Thermatech super heated hot water system, repointed in lime, lime rendered the rear wall, and the client carried out the lime wash finish. We also removed and repealed the lintels. This year it was about getting the rising damp source identified, and some form of sympathetic damp repair. This video is a classic example of you get what you pay for, in regards to damp surveys. We don’t offer free damp surveys because we offer professional surveys, and reports. If you need to find the source of rising damp, penetrating damp, or condensation give us a shout. We offer quantitative damp diagnosis following the methodology in BRE DIGEST 245.


Rising damp cause found after 30 years

By: admin | Posted on: July 25, 2020

This property has been suffering from damp issues for a number of years, and it hasn’t been diagnosed correctly. I was told there were a few suggestions as of why it was thought to be damp, but we have found the cause now. Before you even think about damp proofing a building, it is about elimination before coming to a conclusion. I’ve seen many a times when a damp survey Company have carried out a damp survey, and haven’t eliminated anything in regards to potential causes of rising damp. In this case, this is a classic example of an obvious cause of rising damp, but unfortunately for some people who have paid for a damp survey there is no drain inspection carried out. Now i’m not saying that every property should have a drain survey, but there is British Standards in regards to damp surveys that actually mention this, especially if you have damp internally adjacent a drain. See below from British Standard BS 6576 4.2.1.3 d)

So the question is why doesn’t this get inspected? In my opinion if you ask any surveyor whether the firm is independent or not they will probably not offer a drain survey as this isn’t a piece of equipment they actually have. So it’s unlikely at enquiry stage they would want to lose out on a survey. To be fair though, any prior conversation the surveyor might have had with the client, they might think that from your observations the damp might be more condensation related, and this is reasonable. A decent CCTV drain inspection camera will cost around £5000.00 / £6000.00, plus you will need jetting equipment, and cleaning equipment along with sonde detection. All of this is likely to cost around £15000.00, plus a van to carry it in. You can now see exactly why a general surveyor wouldn’t offer this service.

We have heavily invested in our surveying equipment to ensure we get the diagnosis right first time. If you need a CCTV drain survey along with quantitative moisture analysis following BRE DIGEST 245, please contact us to discuss your issues.

The video below shows the cause of the rising damp. This was caused when the tarmac path was installed over 30 years ago, and damaged the drains.


Calcium carbide meter/speedy meter test

By: admin | Posted on: June 1, 2020

It is presumed by the way of the self proclaimed damp experts that the calcium carbide meter, or also referred to as the speedy meter, is in fact the most reliable form of moisture measurement when it comes to identification of rising damp. Unfortunately most don’t really understand the limitations of the damp measuring instruments, and don’t follow the guidance as per BRE DG245, where part of the sample should be put aside for the hygroscopicity determination.

I own, and have used a calcium carbide meter on many occasions, and in my opinion when measuring moisture, when there is the potential for rising damp and hygroscopic salts this instrument can be massively misleading. I personally only use this when inspecting flood damaged buildings that are more of a modern construction that would unlikely to be contaminated from hygroscopic salts, from a genuine long term rising damp. The reason for this is because you can’t determine what is actually going on regarding the amount of moisture, and giving the correct advice to fix the issues.

Example explanations

The below picture shows the total moisture content of a calcium carbide meter reading of a sample removed from the wall, and placed inside the speedy meter. As you can see it gives a total moisture content of 16 %. The total moisture content (16 %), is made up of the capillary moisture, and the hygroscopic moisture. The speedy meter doesn’t give a figure for these separate amounts, which is the misleading part.

The below picture shows an example of the total moisture content broken down into the capillary moisture, and the hygroscopic moisture.

The below picture shows the same total moisture content as in the above picture, with a capillary moisture content of 1 %, and a hygroscopic moisture content of 15 %….. completely different.

calcium carbide meter

The above images explain the total moisture content, and show that it is impossible for interpreting different moisture content results, without understanding the capillary moisture content, and hygroscopic moisture content on site.

Lets now look at another example with some more guidance of why it is so important to differentiate between capillary moisture and hygroscopic moisture. This is from one of my recent surveys where a traditional solid wall property with no physical damp proof course installed has been damp proofed because it was presumed the property had genuine rising damp and needed a new damp proof course. During this survey I removed samples of plaster/mortar for analysis, and worked out the exact amounts of moisture using the gravimetric laboratory methodology. You can see in my graph below the total moisture content has been split up, to include the capillary and hygroscopic moisture content.

What does this graph show? This is the most important part…. what it shows here, is that there is a very high amount of capillary moisture content, and a low level of hygroscopic moisture content. This is not what you would see on a genuine long term rising damp issue, as you would normally see more of a distinguished hygroscopic salt band. This property actually had issues with drains that I picked up with our CCTV drain survey. The samples were also chemically tested for nitrates and chlorides (hygroscopic salts), and none of any significance were present. All of the data points to drainage issues or possible leaks, and this couldn’t be observed from an onsite calcium carbide meter test. This property needs to be dried down with a Corroventa desiccant tented drying equipment, and the drain issues rectified.

The below graph is something I see often where a physical damp proof course has been installed from new when a property was originally built. The total moisture content is 5%, and so is the hygroscopic moisture content, and the capillary moisture content is 0 %. How could you give suitable advice to your client if you couldn’t differentiate these moisture contents?

What this actually shows is that there is no capillary moisture. Capillary moisture content, is only present if there is a source of water/free moisture such as rising dampness. The amount of capillary moisture content will depend on the permeability, porosity and severity of the water ingress. The absence of capillary moisture indicates that a material is ‘dry’, that is not subject to water ingress from any source. This means normally that the damp proof course is most likely to be bridged, by plaster, debris in the cavity, or perhaps the floor screed. By also chemically testing the mortar samples for nitrates and chlorides, we can prove if these are present. If these are present as in this case, the repair was to remove the bridging issue, along with a suitable plaster repair.

BRE DIGEST 245, BRE DG 245, CALCIUM CARBIDE TEST, SPEEDY METER TEST

Capillary moisture / Free moisture

The second component is the free moisture content which is only present if there is a source of water ingress such as rain penetration, rising dampness. The amount of free moisture will depend on the permeability, porosity and severity of the water ingress. The absence of free moisture indicates that a material is ‘dry’, that is not subject to water ingress from any source.

Ground water salts:
Not only is the distribution of moisture required, we also need to obtain details of past activity of rising dampness, and this can be obtained from the presence and distribution of ground water salts, basically chlorides and nitrates. Where a long term rising damp complex has existed, these salts will always mark the maximum height to which water has risen, and tend to form a concentration (‘salt band’) around the maximum height of rise. I often find on very old properties that have been subjected to long term rising damp over many years, sometimes two distinguished salt bands. Thus, even if water ceases to rise the salts will still remain and ‘mark’ the maximum height once reached. It is the relationship between the distribution of moisture and salts that is the basis of the investigation.

The information regarding speedy meter testing of moisture and gravimetrics has been published and documented by Building Research Establishment (BRE) for many years. The earliest copy I have is the TIL 29 version which was revised in April 1977, and the latest version is BRE DIGEST 245, also known as BRE DG 245. The latest version of this document is from 2007.

Very important extract below from DG 245 2007 edition

Experience has shown that some building materials possess an HMC of up to 5% even without the introduction of salts from external sources. Although only a rough indicator, the 5% threshold does represent a reasonable general guide to whether or not some kind of remedial treatment is needed. This emphasises the importance of the difference between the HMC and MC measured on samples. It can also be useful to establish the MC and HMC of wallpaper, plaster and render, although drying plaster above 35 °C will drive off hydration water bound within the plaster and must be avoided. The figure of 5% at the base of the wall (the wall/floor junction) can be taken as an approximate guide to the presence of rising damp. However, even at this low level of moisture there can be a risk of damage to finishes and rot to any timber that may be in contact with the wall.

If you like this kind of geeky facts on damp, you might like this one that has some screen shots from the British Standards www.completepreservation.co.uk/rising-damp/http://www.completepreservation.co.uk/rising-damp/


Rising damp survey Wiltshire

By: admin | Posted on: January 12, 2020

This shows the very basic damp issues can get confused by some damp survey specialists. In this instance you will see the value of having a paid survey following the methodology in BRE DIGEST 245, which is the only quantitative way to measure moisture, and confirm rising damp with a moisture profile.

My client had a number of free damp surveys and the damp issues on the external wall had been diagnosed as rising damp two times, and also hygroscopic salt damp. This was all diagnosed with a damp meter only, and this isn’t what any of the BRITISH STANDARDS recommend.

When I used the damp meter with the two pins (wme mode) just to map out the moisture in the wall, I noted there were no high readings at the base of the wall, or the skirting board, which would provide a more reliable reading regarding moisture. What I did note was higher readings at high level when the damp meter was used in search mode.

Externally the building is solid red brick and exposed, now this is important because we know there can be a possible issue with penetrating damp because of wind driven rain. On further inspection I noted issues around the lintel that would allow penetrating damp an obvious route into the building.

Now I can understand why the damp surveyor thought it could be hygroscopic salts because often these can be found at higher level. I can’t understand how the other damp surveyors thought it was rising damp, and that a new damp proof course would fix the issues. I can’t understand that the damp surveyors never actually noted the location of the property in regarding the exposed position, and also the external defects.

The below graph shows the moisture profile following BRE DIGEST 245 carried out by Complete Preservation. This visually shows to even a layperson there is no capillary moisture at the base of the wall and that higher levels of capillary moisture are at ceiling height, that are adjacent the external defect. There are no hygroscopic salts present, and no high levels of hygroscopic moisture, which indicates there isn’t a rising damp issue, and never has been a long term rising damp issue.

BRE DIGEST 245 MOISTURE PROFILE

Now whats the solution of repairing the damp issue?

Simply fixing the external defect by carrying out some lime pointing where voids are visible. And then drying the wall down with tented desiccant drying equipment to ensure there is no risk to the timber lintel. Whilst there is an initial survey fee, you can see the value in this, and also the cost of repairs are a lot cheaper than a new damp proof course and plastering. Oh, and there is no disruption and mess to deal with 🙂

We carried out the lime pointing repairs, and the installed the desiccant drying equipment, and signed it off as dry when finished. The client was also a guest on our SuperVision real time moisture data loggers so they could actually log in to see how it was drying down for a transparent service.

If you have a damp issue please don’t hesitate to get in contact with us 01225 769215

enquiries@completepreservation.co.uk


Leak detection

By: admin | Posted on: January 7, 2020

Have you got a damp problem that you can’t figure out? I find many people don’t even consider a leaking pipe buried within a solid floor. Most people are under the assumption that the alleged damp is just simply rising damp. I have also found that home owners have had a number of free surveys and are convinced they actually need a new chemical damp proof course. It’s not until naive people have spent several thousands of pounds on damp proofing that they they contact us to help them out, as they still have a problem.

Locating Water Leaks using advanced electroacoustic ground mics

When a pressurised water pipe leaks the water flows out which causes the pipe and surrounding material (mud, concrete tarmac) to vibrate. This sound, or vibration, is transmitted along the pipe (structure borne water leak noise) and through the surrounding material (ground borne water leak noise). 

With the Aquaphon A200 ground mic set listening for these water leak noises is now easier than ever before.

If you have a possible leak and need some help give us a shout…..